Lizzie Borden The House Fall River Massachusetts

 

Lizzie Borden The House Fall River Massachusetts


Lizzie Borden House
Picture of Lizzie Borden's House
230 Second St, Fall River, MA 02721
Lizzie Bordon, her dad Andrew Jackson Borden, her step mother Abby Durfee Grey and her older sister Emma all lived in the house. The Borden home lacked indoor plumbing on its ground and first floor. Some say the Lizzie Borden house is haunted. They have ghost footage, stories and tales.

Lizzie Borden’s Murder Mystery.

 

Lizzie Borden was born: July 19, 1860, Fall River, MA. She was born the youngest child of Andrew Jackson Borden and Sarah Morse Borden. Her mother died when Lizzie was two years old. Later Andrew married Abby Durfee Grey. Andrew was a well-to-do banker who owned considerable property in his home town of Fall River, Massachusetts.

 

Lizzie and her older sister Emma never felt warmly towards their stepmother. Tension had been growing in the family in the months before the murders, especially over Andrew's gifts to various branches of the family. After Abby's relatives received a house, the sisters demanded and received a rental property which they later sold back to their father for cash and just before the murders a brother of Andrew's first wife had visited regarding transfer of another property. John Vinnicum Morse, the brother of Lizzie's and Emma's deceased mother, visited the home to discuss business matters with Andrew. Some writers have speculated that their conversation, particularly about property transfer, may have aggravated an already tense situation. After Andrew Borden's first transfer of property into his wife's name, both daughters stopped acknowledging Abby altogether. When Andrew tried to smooth the waters by giving an equal amount of property to each daughter, both showed their gratitude by henceforth referring to their stepmother as "Mrs. Borden". During the inquest, the Bordens' live-in maid Bridget Sullivan testified that Lizzie and Emma rarely ate meals with their parents.

 

For several days before the murders the entire household had been violently ill. The family doctor blamed food left on the stove for use in meals over several days, but Abby had feared poisoning, as Andrew Borden had not been a popular man.

 

Andrew Broden was slumped on a couch in the downstairs sitting room, struck 10 or 11 times with a hatchet-like weapon. One of his eyeballs had been split cleanly in two, suggesting he had been asleep when attacked. Soon after, as neighbors and doctors tended Lizzie, Sullivan discovered Abby Borden in the upstairs guest bedroom, her skull crushed by 19 blows.

 

The Lizzie Borden House in Fall River Massachusetts is where the axe murders occurred. With a hatchet-like weapon. Lizzie Borden discovered the body of her father at the home. She called to the family's maid Bridget Sullivan (who had been resting in her third floor room) to "come downstairs...father is dead...somebody got in and murdered him." Andrew Broden was slumped on a couch in the downstairs sitting room, struck 10 or 11 times with a hatchet-like weapon. One of his eyeballs had been split cleanly in two, suggesting he had been asleep when attacked. Soon after, as neighbors and doctors tended Lizzie, Sullivan discovered Abby Borden in the upstairs guest bedroom, her skull crushed by 19 blows.

 

This was also stated by the maid.
On August 4, 1892, Andrew Borden had breakfast with his wife and made his usual rounds of the bank and post office, returning home about 10:45 a.m. The Bordens' maid, Bridget Sullivan, testified that she was in her third-floor room, resting from cleaning windows, when just before 11:10 a.m. she heard Lizzie call out to her from downstairs, "Maggie, come quick! Father's dead. Somebody came in and killed him." Sullivan was sometimes called "Maggie", the name of an earlier maid.

 

After the arrival of family friend Alice Russell and "Dr. Bowen", neighbor Adelaide Churchill asked Lizzie where her mother was. "I don't know," Borden replied, continuing on "but what's she's been killed, too, for I thought I heard her come in." Russell suggested that someone look for Mrs. Borden, and Sullivan and Churchill were sent to the second floor. The two returned shortly thereafter confirming that Lizzie's stepmother was indeed upstairs and dead as well. Both had been slain by what was believed may have been multiple axe blows.

 

Police found a hatchet in the basement which, though free of blood, was missing most of its handle. Lizzie was arrested on August 11; a grand jury began hearing evidence on November 7 and indicted on December 2.

 

The preliminary hearing was held in late August 1892, and the grand jury heard testimony in late November and early December of the same year. Witnesses saw no trace of blood on Lizzie moments after the murder, a circumstantial case was mounted against her. At the inquest, a local pharmacist claimed that Lizzie attempted to purchase prussic acid from him a day before the crime. Then, at the grand jury hearing, incriminating evidence came from her friend, Alice Russell, who testified that Lizzie burned a stained dress, the defense claiming it was paint-stained, three days after the murders. But the most damning evidence came at the trial, when medical experts appeared to prove that Abby Borden was killed approximately an hour and a half before her husband, making it seem that the perpetrator was more likely to have been a member of the household than an outsider.

 

The trial of Lizzie Borden began on June 5, 1893 and lasted two weeks. A turning point in the trial was the dramatic unveiling of the victims' rotting skulls; Lizzie fainted and won much sympathy from the all-male jury. The trial received a tremendous amount of national publicity, a relatively new phenomenon for the times. It has been compared to the later trials of the Bruno Hauptmann and O.J. Simpson as a landmark in media coverage of legal proceedings. Further police questioning, during the inquest, Lizzie Borden stated that she called her stepmother "Mrs. Borden" and demurred on whether they had a cordial relationship. In May 1892 Andrew, believing that pigeons Lizzie kept in the barn were attracting intruders, who then killed them with a hatchet.

 

Evidence was excluded that Lizzie had sought to purchase prussic acid (for cleaning a sealskin cloak, she said) from a local druggist on the day before the murders. Because of the mysterious illness that had struck the household before the murders, the family's milk and Andrew and Abby's stomachs (removed during autopsies performed in the Borden dining room), were tested for poison; no poison was found. The victims' heads were removed during autopsy. After the skulls were used as evidence during the trial – Borden fainted upon seeing them – the heads were later buried at the foot of each grave.

 

On June 20, after deliberating only sixty eight minutes of deliberation. The jury acquitted. And the murders were never solved! This occurred over a century ago. And the result didn’t change much of what the public thought. Many Fall River residents believed in her guilt. As a result, she was ostracized to some degree. Despite her acquittal she remains in popular imagination as a brutal murderess. And for years, on the anniversary of the murders, the more sensational press re-accused her of the crime. The infamous doggerel endured, insinuating her guilt into the public mind. Still some say Lizzie Borden house is haunted.

 

After the trial, Lizzie and Emma split their inheritance and bought a much larger house up on the hill which Lizzie christened Maplecroft. She also changed her name from Lizzie to Lizbeth. More than a dozen years after the murders, she and her sister became estranged, and after Emma left Maplecroft in 1905, the two lived apart until their deaths in 1927. Lizzie Borden died: June 1, 1927, Fall River, MA.

 

 

Lizzie Borden died of complications from gall bladder surgery on June 1, 1927, at the age of sixty-six. Emma died nine days later. One-seventh of Lizzie's considerable estate was left to the Animal Rescue League of Fall River and the remainder to those friends and servants who stayed loyal to her over the years.

 

Picture of Lizzie Borden
Lizzie Borden's Picture
Lizzie Borden's Picture

 

Lizzie Borden Halloween


I don't know about you but that gave me the creeps! Lizzie Borden Halloween seems to have what it take to scare me. What do you think does deserve a write up on Halloween Fun Scare if so please share. And thanks! Some parts with help from About Wikipedia
Why Lizzie Borden Murder Case Will Remain Forever a Mystery By Michelle Dean At Flavorwire.com
Some say Lizzie Borden house is haunted they have GHOST FOOTAGE. Haunted Lizzie Borden House Ghost EVP Caught On Camera Ghost Attacks Paranormal Investigators Camera At Haunted Lizzie Borden Haunted House.

 

 

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Them came the poem. Lizzie Borden took an axe, And gave her mother forty whacks, When she saw what she had done, She gave her father forty-one.

 

Lizzie Borden took an axe, And gave her mother forty whacks, When she saw what she had done, She gave her father forty-one.

 

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